Practitioner Research

A collection of resources about practitioners undertaking research compiled as part of the Practitioner Research and Older People's Support (PROP) project.

Short break support is failing family carers: reviewing progress 10 years on from Mencap’s first Breaking Point report

In 2006 Mencap produced a comprehensive review of short break provision. Now, 10 years on, they are revisiting the support available for family carers to see whether recent policy initiatives and investment have delivered the much-needed change. A total of 264 family carers responded to their survey on short breaks provision and experiences of caring. They also sent Freedom of Information requests to all 152 local authorities in England that provide social care services. This report looks at short breaks provision in a climate of cuts to central and local government budgets.

Can yoga create calm in people with dementia?

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and Iriss that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by Sarah Duff from Alzheimer Scotland who participated in the PROP2 programme and is a research study exploring the experience of group yoga classes and music with those affected by dementia

Resilience and wellbeing in people living with dementia in relation to perceived attitudes in their communities

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and Iriss that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by Geraldine Ditta from Alzheimer Scotland who participated in the PROP2 programme.

How do we ensure that training and information support contributes to positive outcomes for carers?

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and Iriss that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by Alan Gilmour from Glasgow City Community Health Partnership who participated in the PROP2 programme.

‘I’ve been thinking’: How does completing life story work affect people with dementia?

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by iain Houston from Alzeimer Scotland who participated in the PROP2 programme.

What this research paper explores:
An explorative case study investigating how completing a life story project affected a person with dementia.

With a little help from my friends: The ‘Circle of Friends’ approach

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by Raymond Brennan from ENABLE Scotland who participated in the PROP2 programme.

What helps women who have learning disabilities get checked for cervical cancer?

This is a paper produced as part of the PROP2 (Practitioner Research: Outcomes and Partnership) programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care in Scotland.

This paper was written by Elaine Monteith from ENABLE Scotland who participated in the PROP2 programme.

Becoming a 'Boundary Spanner' through practitioner-research: PROP contribution story 1

Report that details the impacts of the PROP project on the practitioners and organisations involved. It focuses on the activities undertaken to learn about and 'do' research, as well the challenges and enablers encountered along the way.

It suggests that taking part in PROP allowed practitioners to become 'Boundary Spanners' between research and practice.