Drug and Alcohol Misuse

This paper discusses the language surrounding addiction and recovery and the New Recovery Advocacy Movement.

This review aims to address the question: 'What are the harmful health effects of taking ecstasy(MDMA) for recreational use?' It does not examine the harmful indirect and/or social effects, such as effects on driving and road traffic accidents and the consequences of any effect MDMA may have on sexual behaviour.

The first comprehensive overview of how and why heroin is prescribed in the UK. Prescribing heroin is the first overview of how and why heroin is prescribed in the UK. It brings together research evidence from the UK and elsewhere to provide a comprehensive review of the benefits and drawbacks of heroin prescription. Currently only a small number of UK doctors prescribe heroin. The government is planning a cautious and modest expansion of this treatment. This study considers whether heroin prescription is effective in the short and the long term.

Annual report of the INCB covering the international drug control conventions, the operation of the international drug control system and giving an analysis of the world situation as well as recommendations to governments and other national and international bodies.

Mixing alcohol and cocaine is probably one of the most common drug combinations in modern culture. But is the mix a recipe for violence? Max Daly investigates.

outline the huge literature on the potentially negative impact on children of growing up with a parent who has an alcohol or drug problem, the risk factors that can exacerbate this effect, and resilience and the protective factors that can reduce it. Clear ways that practitioners can intervene to reduce risk and to increase resilience are discussed.

A plan to significantly reduce the harm caused by alcohol in Scotland.

A learning resource on alcohol and drugs. This handout is used as pre-course reading for the STRADA course 'Working with Drug and Alcohol Users'.

A dozen rehabs in the UK have closed and others made counsellors redundant. Most depend on the state for clients – but it refers only 2% of drug abusers to drug-free treatment, creating a crisis of empty beds and waiting lists of people desperate to fill them. Taxes were spent on a redefinition of “recovery” excluding drug/alcohol-free goals. Deirdre Boyd feels the seven-year itch for change.