Drug and Alcohol Misuse

BioSocieties is committed to the scholarly exploration of the crucial social, ethical and policy implications of developments in the life sciences and biomedicine. It provides a crucial forum where the most rigorous social research and critical analysis of these issues can intersect with the work of leading scientists, social researchers, clinicians, regulators and other stakeholders.

Although alcohol is widely recognised as a major generator of employment and income from exports in Scotland, a considerable (and increasing) amount of harm is associated with its misuse.

The effects of this misuse – which are considered in this paper – are wide, and generate substantial costs not only for the health service, but also for criminal justice, communities, employers, and the wider Scottish economy.

The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) report Hidden Harm (2003) outlined key deficits in the provision of services to pregnant drug users, drug using parents and to the children of drug using parents, while highlighting the extent of child exposure to parental drug use. In 2007, a follow-up report assessed what had changed in the intervening period focusing on examples of good practice and positive change. This paper is based on the results from a follow-up postal survey of managers of specialist drug services in the UK.

Between February and June 2001, the Scottish Executive Health Department undertook a consultation exercise to inform the development of its Plan for Action on alcohol problems. As part of this exercise, various pieces of research were commissioned to explore issues around alcohol misuse in Scottish society.

This paper presents the main findings of a study which obtained the views of problem drinkers,current and former alcohol service users and their families and friends.

This review describes research into, and practice of universal drug prevention. It provides information on several different approaches, including school and family based, communities, mass media and generic health interventions. This work is placed in the context of relevant national policy (UK).

This article, see page 15 of the magazine, by Professor David Clark introduces the work of William White and colleagues in the USA on the subject of recovery in the substance misuse field.

Paper that has been produced by an expert group of clinicians and academics in the field of substance misuse in Scotland and aims to advise ministers on the place of methadone in the treatment of substance misuse in Scotland.

The Recovery Bill of Rights is a statement of the principle that all Americans have a right to recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs.