Drug and Alcohol Misuse

How directive the therapist is in the face of client resistance is emerging as one of the strongest and most consistent influences on the outcomes of therapy. There is no one right answer - it all depends on the client, in particular on how much they perceive and react against threats to their autonomy.

The purpose of this review is to summarize policy research findings in the area of maternal prenatal substance abuse to (1) inform and advance this field, (2) identify future research needs, (3) inform policy making and (4) identify implications for policy. As a review, this is a systematic analysis of existing data (findings) on maternal drug use during pregnancy for determining the best policy among the alternatives for dealing with drug using mothers and their children.

Alcoholism is one of the most common psychiatric disorders with a prevalence of 8 to 14 percent. This heritable disease is frequently accompanied by other substance abuse disorders (particularly nicotine), anxiety and mood disorders, and antisocial personality disorder.

Although associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, alcoholism often goes unrecognized in a clinical or primary health care setting. Several brief screening instruments are available to quickly identify problem drinking, often a pre-alcoholism condition.

This summary sets out the main findings from a review of the recent literature on strategies to tackle illicit drug markets and distribution networks in the UK.

A training resource about service user involvement in your organisation.

A Rapid Evidence Assessment of international literature on effective substance misuse services for homeless people was conducted to review best practice in other countries and determine if there were any lessons for Scotland.

This is the first in a series of Evaluation Guides designed to support improvements in practice. Individuals and organisations are increasingly called upon to evaluate the services they provide for drug users. This is a sensible approach because good evaluation has the potential to improve drug services. It can help to identify what works, what needs to be improved and what is ineffective. However, evaluation needs to be useful, practical and realistic.

Report of the recommendations made by the 21st Century Social Work Review Group for the future of social services in Scotland. Published by the Scottish Government in February 2006, it set out a new direction for social work services in Scotland based on the strong core values of inclusiveness and meeting the whole needs of individuals and families. It seeks to equip social work services to rise to the challenge of supporting and protecting our most vulnerable people and communities in the early part of the 21st century.

This research examines the effectiveness of drug education in Scottish Schools. The research consisted of a literature review, a survey of schools, classroom observations and qualitative research with young people and was commissioned in response to the School Drug Safety Team’s recommendation for research into the outcomes and process of educating young people on drug related issues. Research was conducted between February 2004 and July 2005.