Drug and Alcohol Misuse

Integrating organisations and services is a daunting task and there is plenty of evidence that outcomes can be poor if services are delivered in a fragmented way to people who need access to care. With that in mind, Government has placed a duty of partnership on the main statutory bodies and integration remains a major aspect of its ‘modernisation’ plans for public services.

This report gives the Scottish Government's response to the Scottish Advisory Committee on Drug Misuse-Essential Care Working Group Report 'Essential Care: a report on the approach required to maximise opportunity for recovery from problem substance misuse in Scotland'.

This response addresses each of the 15 recommendations, outlining both current and planned action by the Government and its delivery partners.

This resource provides best practice guidance on a framework for commissioning and providing interventions and treatment for adults affected by alcohol misuse. It describes a four tier system of stepped care for alcohol misusers.

This article, pages 8 and 9, covers news and views from the second national service user involvement conference in Birmingham. Using results of a consultation at the event, DDN looks at whether service users had been offered choices about treatment - and whether those choices had worked well for them.

The ASP Act was passed by the Scottish Parliament in February 2007.

Part 1 of the Act requires councils to make enquiries to determine whether action is required to stop or prevent harm; requires specified public bodies to co-operate with councils; introduces a range of protection orders; and makes provision for the establishment of local multi-agency adult protection committees.

This review is taken from the Manners Matter Series which is about how services can encourage clients to stay and do well by the manner in which they offer treatment.

Harm reduction has become one of the most contentious issues in drug use policy. The initial clarity and simplicity of the phrase "harm reduction" has evolved into an emotion-laden designation that has polarized groups with a common goal and is interfering with opportunities to engage high-risk populations and the implementation of a range of substance abuse services and supports.