Drug and Alcohol Misuse

The former First Minister, Jack McConnell, announced a review of the place of methadone in drug treatment programmes on 6 March 2006 following the death of 2 year old Derek Doran. This review was conducted at the same time as the wider inter-departmental programme of work being undertaken across the Executive on children in drug abusing households.

There is increasing public, political and media interest in the use of methadone in drug treatment and in the perceived public risk posed by ‘leakage’ into the wider community, particularly in relation to children.

This guidance is designed to direct commissioners in areas where tackling alcohol harm is an identified priority, to the resources and guidance, which will assist them in commissioning interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm in their local community. It offers ways to improve commissioning, looking at each World Class Commissioning competency and all stages in the commissioning cycle.

This report summarises the results of the third and final sweep of a study to estimate the prevalence of ‘problem drug use’ (defined as use of opiates and/or crack cocaine) nationally (England only), regionally, and locally. An overview of national and Government Office Region estimates are presented in this report, as are comparisons with the estimates produced by the second (2005/06) sweep of the study.

This resource is a summary of a research report into the Tayside Domestic Abuse and Substance Misuse Project. The findings presented in this report include a review of the literature on the links between domestic abuse and substance misuse, and secondary analysis of service user questionnaires, interviews with service users and interviews with domestic abuse and substance misuse service providers.

This blog is written by David Clark, director of Wired In, an organisation that empowers individuals, families and communities to tackle substance use problems, encouraging and enabling people to find their path to recover. This page of the blog contains background briefings.

English National Evaluation fails to support Drug Education Programme. In the British context, it was expected to decide whether an evidence-based, well structured and well resourced drug education programme could contribute to reducing youth substance use, yet the multi-million pound Blueprint study never got near fulfilling its promise. Though nothing definitive could be concluded from the study, signs were that in both knowledge and prevention terms, the lessons were not an advance on routine personal, social and health education.

Research into the effects of user involvement on treatment is finding that it makes people feel helped - but not drug-free.

IHRA is the leading organisation in promoting evidence based harm reduction policies and practices on a global basis for all psychoactive substances (including illicit drugs, tobacco and alcohol).