Drug and Alcohol Misuse

An exploration of the experiences of young people (15-27 years) affected by parental drug and/or alcohol misuse. This report provides an in-depth account of the impact of parental substance misuse on parenting, on roles within the family, and on relationships. It identifies differences in the effects of drug and alcohol misuse and the relevance of gender and socio-economic status.

This report is a 'primer for addiction counselors and recovery coaches' and discusses change in the professional addiction treatment community. Addressed to the thousands of counselors and therapists on the daily firing line, it offers them a renaissance of ideas that will provide the suffering addicts with which they work an increased opportunity for lasting recovery.

Cognitive-behavioural therapies are among the most widespread and influential approaches to substance use, yet this analysis found they conferred just a small advantage over other therapies. Perhaps other features are more important than the therapeutic 'brand'.

Report identifying the extent of partner abuse in Scotland, both since the age of 16 and over a 12-month period. It assesses the nature and impact of partner abuse and explores the extent to which people or organisations were informed about the abuse, in particular contact with the police about the incident.

Research that highlight's some important issues surrounding the role alcohol plays in society, perceptions of what constitutes problem drinking and awareness of and attitudes towards services. It also explores perceptions of 'what works'. A problem for policy-makers is the questionable compatibility of strategies to, on the one hand, stress that ‘getting legless’ is not normal or socially acceptable, while on the other, trying to reduce stigmatisation associated with alcohol problems so as to encourage people to seek help through services.

The FEAD project began in February 2008 and was designed and developed in-house at Lifeline project. The FEAD initiative grew in direct proportion to the quality of the contributions and generosity of the contributors. In a period of change for the drugs field we are pleased to be able to open the door to our own learning and perspectives, and do so for people who visit the website.

In spring 2008, DrugScope hosted a series of seminars on the future of drug treatment. The Great Debate gathered together DrugScope members, along with other experts and stakeholders with direct experience of drug treatment, representing a range of different views and treatment philosophies.

This summary sets out the main findings from a review of the recent literature on strategies to tackle illicit drug markets and distribution networks in the UK. The report was commissioned by the UK Drug Policy Commission and has been prepared by the Institute for Criminal Policy Research, School of Law, King’s College London. This review restricted itself to domestic measures for tackling the drugs trade.

The Ministerial Task Force on health inequalities was set up by the current Scottish Government. The aim is to tackle the inequalities in health which prevent Scotland reaching its potential. This document meets the Task Force’s commitment to report on what now needs to be done to tackle health inequalities more effectively.

This resource introduces the idea of a reflective journal and includes outcomes to work through to gain understanding as to how to link learning with practice and how to examine work practice in detail.