Child Protection

This legislation sets out procedures for the prevention of crime and disorder with reference to: anti-social behaviour orders and youth crime; criminal law and racially aggravated offences; the criminal justice system and youth justice; dealing with offenders, specifically sexual offenders, those dependent on drugs and young offenders. Further procedure is laid out in respect of the detention, release and recall of prisoners and increased powers of arrest by the police.

Presents new evidence on the damaging effects of neglect and the challenges of dealing with the issue, as told by the professionals in a position to spot the early warning signs – before more serious concerns are reported to the police or social workers. It paints a worrying picture from the frontline of the signs and consequences of child neglect as seen in nurseries, primary schools, hospitals and in local communities across the UK.

The Scottish Children's Reporter Administration (SCRA) is the national body responsible for providing a world class care and justice system for all Scotland's children. SCRA became fully operational on 1st April 1996 and their main responsibilities are; to facilitate the work of Children's Reporters; to deploy and manage staff to carry out that work; and to provide suitable accommodation for Children's Hearings.

The first part of the guidance sets out what is currently known about the extent of parental problem drug use and the impact on children. The second tackles the complex area of confidentiality and offers advice to agencies about when, and how, to share information. Part 3 outlines what agencies need to ask of families when they present with drug problems.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series asks if a community can recover when a known abuser returns to live there and if a small community can help in the rehabilitation of a sex offender. What benefits does the community gain? A mother whose daughter was sexually abused by a local man is concerned how his return to their community will affect her family's lives. Jenni Murray talks to child psychotherapist Anne Bannister to discuss how a community can heal itself when a known paedophile lives within it.

This Act was developed in response to investigations carried out by a Scottish Parliament committee which concluded that a new and independent office of 'Commissioner for Children and Young People' (the Commissioner) should be established. There are a number of principles which underpin the Act. These are that the Commissioner is independent; the best interests of children and young people should be a primary consideration in all matters affecting them; and the views of children and young people should be taken into account in accordance with age and maturity.

The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the ideas and research evidence on child abuse and child protection in order to inform the work of the child protection review team. It is predominantly a review of UK research evidence. In some areas, however, UK evidence was found to be lacking and reference has been made to research from the US, Australia and elsewhere.

This literature review examines the ways in which young carers come to the attention of voluntary and statutory agencies, and factors inhibiting identification. It identifies the ways in which young carers’ needs are assessed and it examines approaches to service provision by both statutory and voluntary agencies. The review also identifies approaches that are successful in meeting the social, educational and health needs of young carers.

The Committee set itself a challenging action plan and this annual report sets out what action has been taken forward individually and collectively over the last year in pursuance of stronger and more effective child protection services. The report also contains an action plan for the year ahead in which a number of commitments are made which are designed to ensure continuous improvement of the services provided across the Falkirk area.

Poor information sharing has been identified as a contributory factor in a number of catastrophic child protection cases.

The aim of this code is to improve practice by giving staff clear guidance on when and how to share information legally and professionally about children at risk of harm.