Child Protection

Guidance for all practitioners including those working in: children and family social work; health; education; residential care; early years; youth services; youth justice; police; independent and third sector; and adult services who might be supporting parents with disabled children or involved in the transition between child and adult services.

A programme run by the Scottish Universities Insight Institute (SUII).  

The key objectives of this project are to:

The first in a series of four seminars. It introduced the concept of intersectionality and debates its meanings and purposes for understanding childhood identities and inequalities. It explored the different ways in which this framework can be put into practice by practitioners and policy makers. The seminar involved a combination of short presentations, group discussions and a plenary conversation and addressed the following questions:

This paper reports on a study which examined child protection system assessment and case management of SIDEs (serious injury - discrepant explanation) in 38 families involving 45 seriously - or fatally injured children (0-2 years).

This training activity consists of 20 case scenarios and staff are asked to identify whether or not each scenario constitutes abuse of neglect. They are also asked to consider the needs of children at each developmental stage. These exercises can be done individually initially but require group discussion to explore issues effectively.

The Child Protection Committee (CPC) is the lynchpin in implementing strategic plans at local level. In this report the CPC has, in accordance with the National Guidance on Child Protection Committees – Protecting Children and Young People 2005 (Appendix 2), given an account of its work in the previous year, demonstrated the quality of inter-agency co-operation in undertaking the work of the Committee, and presented a business plan for the coming year.

This short training scenario was originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next. A school is concerned about the behaviour of a disabled child who receives monthly respite care.

This course is a mixture of didactic input and case scenario exercises. It also includes a PowerPoint presentation called 'A Multi Agency Understanding of Child Protection Related to Disability'. The course offers information on the current state of knowledge about the abuse of disabled children and the challenges of their adequate protection. There is then an opportunity for participants to make use of this knowledge using some brief case scenarios. Exercise can last approximately 2.5 hours and is appropriate for groups of 8-25.

This review considers parents' actual and potential contributions to children's resilience and to parental resilience. The review draws on important UK-based publications on resilience and includes more selective references to the comparatively huge American literature, as well as significant material from elsewhere.

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.